nextScan Develops a Wide-Format, Continuous Feed, Aerial Film Scanner

Fastest aerial film conversion scanner ever from Digital Check Corp.’s microfilm division

Meridian, ID, March 16, 2022 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Apex by nextScan™ is a revolutionary film scanner for processing aerial and other large format film.  Over the last two years, nextScan — the microfilm conversion division of Digital Check Corp. — has been working closely with an agency to develop the world’s first high-speed aerial film scanner. The Apex is the result of the development and can convert large-format film rolls from 70 mm to 260 mm (2.25 to 10.23 inches) wide into digital images in minutes. This process had previously taken hours or days to complete by hand, by stitching digital segments together.

NextScan had been challenged to deliver a prototype of a high-speed aerial film scanner that would dramatically increase the output of digital aerial images. NextScan engineers envisioned a “scaled-up” version of the Eclipse, nextScan’s fastest rollfilm scanner that delivers up to 2,000 pages per minute at 200 dpi and 24x reduction ratio. The Apex scanner processes film up to 10.23 inches wide at 10 feet per minute, or two inches per second, at a 4-micron spot size. For comparison, a single human hair ranges from 17 to 180 microns.

A unique implementation of nextScan’s line-scanning technology makes capturing and converting large format film possible. Instead of a single camera, as nextScan employs on standard rollfilm and fiche conversion microfilm scanners, the Apex scanner uses four cameras working at once. The images generated by these four cameras are seamlessly stitched together with no overlap or image loss. NextScan also utilized the LuminTec™ lighting technology on the Apex to deliver perfect images while the film is moving at high speed.

The Apex scanner generates a tremendous amount of data. When scanning 10-inch film, the Apex captures 819,000,000 pixels per second, which, in 12-bit data capture, generates 1.53 gigabytes of data per second. The amount of data scanned is equivalent to filling a Blu-Ray DVD every two seconds. This data is captured by an internal 120-terabyte Ribbon Storage Device (RSD) that can instantly convert film to live, digital images on the fly.

Governments worldwide have been collecting and digitizing aerial images for intelligence purposes for decades. This information is vital to support many official programs including, strategic intelligence, warfighter support, homeland defense, navigational safety, topographic, terrain, humanitarian, and disaster relief. Creating digital files of this critical information allows for the ability to share this information making it easily accessible for decision makers.

About nextScan
Originally incorporated in 2002 and acquired by Digital Check Corp. in 2015, nextScan gives the microfilm and microfiche conversion market a high-performance alternative to older technologies. nextScan’s innovative patented products are designed and built with simplicity and functionality to increase user production and lower overall costs for scanning film and fiche. nextScan products are designed with cutting-edge components: the latest in camera; lighting; image correction; scanning speed; and nextScan’s pioneering “Ribbon” scanning software, NextStar PLUS. nextScan products provide a full conversion solution that far exceeds the speed, functionality and return on investment of other scanners in the market.  

About Digital Check
Digital Check is the leading worldwide provider of check scanners and peripherals for the banking industry. Our TellerScan®, CheXpress®, and SmartSource® lines of scanners provide the industry’s most reliable performance with superior MICR and image quality. Digital Check’s software delivers image enhancement and deposit-processing technologies that help clients reduce costs and improve efficiency. Learn more at www.digitalcheck.com.

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